History Program Focuses on Crimes and Criminals

  James Q. Anderson, left, one of Klamath County’s most notorious criminals in the 1950s, is seen eating breakfast with Sheriff Murray “Red” Britton in this 1955 newspaper photo. (Klamath County Museum)

James Q. Anderson, left, one of Klamath County’s most notorious criminals in the 1950s, is seen eating breakfast with Sheriff Murray “Red” Britton in this 1955 newspaper photo. (Klamath County Museum)

“Infamous Crimes and Criminals of Klamath, Part One,” is the title of a program to be presented Thursday, Oct. 26, at the monthly meeting of the Klamath County Historical Society.

The program begins at 7 p.m. in the back meeting room of the Klamath County Museum, 1451 Main St. Admission is free.

Among the criminal figures to be discussed is James Quentin Anderson, who grew up near Bly and was convicted of manslaughter at age 17. He escaped from prison near the end of his 10-year sentence.

Not long after being released from prison he was convicted of a separate murder. He appealed his conviction all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in 1961 declined to hear his case.

Anderson was also involved in traffic accidents that killed three people, and was charged with numerous other crimes.

Thursday’s program will recount the 1932 murder trial of Joseph “Hot Shot Joe” Daniels, a bootblack who was released after a mistrial was declared in a race-charged case.

The presentation will also include a telling of the exploits of two rodeo cowboys and “mountain renegades” from Malin, Love Chandler and Billy Sims, whose outlaw ways in the early 1900s led to their untimely deaths.

Presenters on Thursday will include Ryan Bartholomew, Carol Mattos and Todd Kepple.

For more information contact Historical Society President Dave Taylor at (541) 273-0953.