KCSO Search and Rescue Sharpens Skills in 24-Hour Training Event

Volunteers of the Klamath County Search and Rescue held a 24-hour training at a snow camp at Annie Creek Snow-Park. Travis Griffin , Terry Brown, Tayla Gale, Matt Marshall, Chris Rhode, TJ Lombardi, Gage Knox, Megan Mangels, Cari Norlin, Nathan King, Mike Moser. (Submitted photo)

Volunteers of the Klamath County Search and Rescue held a 24-hour training at a snow camp at Annie Creek Snow-Park. Travis Griffin , Terry Brown, Tayla Gale, Matt Marshall, Chris Rhode, TJ Lombardi, Gage Knox, Megan Mangels, Cari Norlin, Nathan King, Mike Moser. (Submitted photo)

Over this past weekend, Klamath County Search and Rescue (SAR) volunteers conducted an annual training at the Annie Creek Snow-Park. The exercise culminated in eleven volunteers participating by setting up a snow camp, with only what they could carry on their person, and surviving overnight (24 hours).

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Also participating in the training were volunteers from the Jackson County SAR group who often work side by side with Klamath County SAR during the year.

“I met people from all walks of life during my visit to the exercise. A retired dentist, government service employees, educators, military personnel, a lawyer, law enforcement personnel, students, and others. All were volunteers and they were enjoying each other’s company and training hard to fulfill their mission when called upon,” said Chris Kaber, Klamath County Sheriff.

Sheriff Kaber continued, “I was able to visit all eleven people who’d built a shelter from materials they located in the woods and each one had started a warming fire to get them through what proved to be a chilly night. They were all in good spirits as the sun started to go down and all made it through the night becoming fully fledged SAR members once the sun rose again. What a great group of people they are - all of them.” 

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The weekend was an opportunity to gather and ensure the safety of those experiencing the challenge of spending the night outdoors. It also provided a chance to use much of the equipment necessary for a rescue during the winter and to make sure all was operational and functioning properly.

Aiding in the event was a Sno-Cat operated by John Briggs who volunteers with the Chiloquin Ridge Riders and is also a SAR volunteer. The Chiloquin Ridge Riders maintain more than 300 miles of trails throughout the winter for recreational users.

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Klamath County residents deserve to know the dedication and personal expense provided by more than 80 unpaid volunteers of the Klamath County Search and Rescue Unit.

Sheriff Kaber adds, “We hope you’ll never need their service - but if you do - you will have a great group of people trying to rescue you.”

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